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Quote of the week

Courage is grace under pressure. Ernest Hemingway

Research Fellow Writes for The Conversation

21/07/16

Dr. Blaire Morgan, Research Fellow, has written a piece for The Conversation titled 'Is social media messing with children’s morals?' Blaire's research is on the Influence of Parents and Social Media on Children's Moral Functioning, and the article discusses findings from a recent parents poll for the project, which found that  more than half of UK parents think popular social media sites hamper their children’s moral development.

The article is available to read below.

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Deputy Director Chairs Keynote Panel at IPEN Festival in Dallas

20/07/16

Professor Kristján Kristjánsson chaired a keynote panel at the first International Festival on Positive Education in Dallas on 19th July. The panel explored the philosophical and conceptual underpinnings of positive education and included presentations by Professors Nancy Snow, Randall Curren and Blaine Fowers. Find out more about the Festival here.

 

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The Jubilee Youth Awards 2016

15/07/16

On Thursday 14th July 2016, the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues held the 2016 Jubilee Youth Awards at the House of Lords. Hosted by Lord James O’Shaughnessy, 14 young people from across the UK were honoured with Jubilee Youth Awards, across three of the Jubilee Centre's awards and contests programmes. 

The Centre celebrated the winners of the Jubilee Youth Awards for Service, the Thank You Letter Awards and Why Virtue Matters: Essay Contest, for 2016. Over 40,000 young people have taken part in the 2016 Thank You Letter Awards, across 200 schools. 600 essays were submitted into the Why Virtues Matters Essay Contest and 100 nominations were received and considered for a Jubilee Youth Award for Service.

The ceremony was introduced by Prof. James Arthur, Director of the Jubilee Centre, and awards were presented by Sir Nick Parker, Chair of Trustees of Step up to Serve, and Lord O'Shaughnessy. Dr. Rania Marandos, Deputy Chief Executive of Step Up To Serve, Dr. Tom Harrison, Director of Education for the Jubilee Centre and Prof. Kristján Kristjánsson, Deputy Director for the Jubilee Centre announced the winners across each of the three categories.

The Jubilee Youth Award Winners are listed below:

Jubilee Youth Award for Service Winners, 2016

Andrew Lees                                     Lanarkshire

Charlotte King                                   West Sussex

Jordan Dixon                                     Central London

Kimarla Johnson                               Greater London

Mary-Beth McFern                           East Lothian

Patrick Cantellow                              Kent

Reece Lunt                                        Tyne and Wear

Yasmin Tyrrell                                   Belfast

 

Thank You Letter Award Winners, 2016

Primary Winner:

Adaeze Ordu                                     St Teresa Catholic Primary School, Greater London

Secondary Winner:

Peace Buraimo                                  King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Girls, West Midlands

 

Essay Contest: Why Virtue Matters Winners, 2016

Primary Winners:

Lucy Snowdon                                   Dame Allan’s Schools, Northumberland              

Mollie McHardy,                               Heversham St Peter’s CE Primary School, Cumbria

Secondary Winners:

Jessica Bonner                                  Highclare School, West Midlands  

Awais Hussain                                  Dixons Kings Academy, West Yorkshire

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Jubilee Centre Poll: Social Media Sites Obstruct Children’s Moral Development, Say Parents

14/07/16

More than half of UK parents think popular social media sites hamper their children’s moral development, according to a poll commissioned by the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues. The 'parent poll' also reveals only 15% of parents think the popular sites provide a positive influence on young people’s character. A significant number of parents (40%) are “concerned” or “extremely concerned” about the negative and potentially harmful impact of social media. The poll, the first of its type conducted in the UK, provides a unique insight into the way moral values are portrayed on social media. It points to widespread parental anxieties about the influence of online networks on children as young as 11, who are often using the sites despite age limits. Other key findings include:

  • Anger, arrogance and hatred are among the top negative character traits, or vices, reported by parents on social media;
  • A quarter of parents highlight a lack of forgiveness and self-control among users;
  • As an antidote to the negative findings, almost three-quarters (72%) of parents who use social media see content containing a positive moral message at least once a day;
  • The “character strengths” promoted most regularly are humour, appreciation of beauty, creativity, love, courage and kindness.

The full press release is available here. The story became the lead article on the BBC Education pages on 18th July 2016.

You can read more about the virtues and vices of social media in this latest Jubilee Centre blog post.

The project page is available here.

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Research Fellows Present at Eighth European Positive Psychology Conference (ECPP)

11/07/16

The Eighth European Positive Psychology Conference (ECPP) took place in Angers, France, between June 28th and July 1st 2016.  Research Fellows Drs. Blaire Morgan and Liz Gulliford spoke at one of the 24 thematic paper sessions, presenting the findings from their cross-cultural replication of three empirical strands of the An Attitude for Gratitude research project. Liz and Blaire gave a paper based on the Taking 'Thanks' for Granted: Unravelling the Concept of Gratitude in a Developmental, Cross-Cultural Analysis report, which was funded by a Society for Educational Studies (SES) small grant, and presented findings of a cross-cultural study of the understanding of gratitude to an international audience.

An abstract for Liz and Blaire's presentation is given below and the PowerPoint presentation is available here.

Paper Session: Cross-Cultural Differences in Gratitude Experience
Theme: Cross-Cultural Approach
Authors:  B. Morgan (1) L. Gulliford (1) L. Waters (2)
Authors' Address: (1) Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues, University of Birmingham, UK (2) Centre for Positive Psychology, Melbourne Graduate School of Education, University of Melbourne, Australia
Abstract: As is well known, gratitude has been related to a host of intrapersonal, interpersonal and health benefits. However, gratitude research tends to have had the narrow aim of increasing gratitude experience without much opportunity for probing the meaning of the concept itself. We believe a more effective method of fostering moral values, such as gratitude, would be to encourage reflection on what gratitude is, and when and why it is experienced (Morgan, Gulliford & Carr, 2015; Carr, Morgan & Gulliford, 2015). We have developed instruments to shed light on both children’s and adults’ understanding of the concept. We have used these instruments to examine developmental differences in the understanding of gratitude in both the UK and Australia and report the extent to which understandings of gratitude differ cross-culturally. Findings from a prototype analysis of gratitude conducted in Australia will be compared with our UK study (Morgan, Gulliford & Kristjansson, 2014), and the earlier findings of Lambert, Graham and Fincham’s (2009) US study. This cross-cultural comparison of ‘gratitude features’ reveals that, relative to Australia and US, our UK sample demonstrates more negative associations with the construct. We also present findings from a vignette questionnaire probing intuitions about gratitude. The questionnaire was compiled following an extensive literature review on how gratitude is conceptualised (Gulliford, Morgan, & Kristjánsson, 2013). It presents various scenarios to which respondents decide whether (and to what degree) gratitude is appropriate. For instance, if a benefactor has ulterior motives, are you still grateful for the benefit they bestow? Should you be grateful to someone who is doing their job? We compare UK responses to this questionnaire with our Australian sample of young people and adults. Australian adults, for example, deem benefits that do not materialise as more worthy of gratitude than do UK adults, and UK adults report less gratitude in response to non-valuable benefits. Finally we report on the findings from our gratitude stories for children. The stories incorporate themes elaborated in the vignettes, enabling us to examine the way in which different factors that may impact on gratitude differ across the lifespan and between different cultures. Whilst in need of further replication, these results seem to suggest that Australian children may place fewer conditions on when gratitude is due. This research provides important insights into the conception of gratitude, how this might change and develop across the life-span, and the degree to which it differs cross-culturally. Such differences will inevitably impact upon gratitude interventions and gratitude measurement. Furthermore, educational interventions are currently adopted from different countries (primarily from the USA) without appropriate sensitivity to cultural differences. We believe these cross-cultural differences deserve further scrutiny.

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Can You Teach Character? Centre Produce Short Film

11/07/16

As part of the content for the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues and University of Birmingham MA in Character Education, the Jubilee Centre has produced a short film titled Can You Teach Character? The film, made by award-winning producers The Moment, includes the voices of staff and pupils from the University of Birmingham School, a school dedicated to the development of character of its pupils. The short film demonstrates the character-led approach that the University of Birmingham School has taken, and the response from pupils on the development of their character. The film is available to view here

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Jubilee Centre Partner Awarded UoB Alumna of the Year

08/07/16

On Thursday 7th July, Charlotte Hill, CEO of Step Up to Serve, was awarded an honorary degree at the University of Birmingham degree congregations, and awarded the title of Alumna of the Year. Charlotte studied Political Science and Philosophy at the University of Birmingham. Following the 2012 review into youth social action, Step Up To Serve was established in 2013 to coordinate the #iwill campaign. It is run by a small dynamic team of dedicated and experienced staff, supported by secondees from partner organisations. The Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues has partnered with Step Up to Serve since its launch, and continues to collaborate on multiple projects, and provide a dedicated academic researcher to work as part of the Step Up to Serve team.

Jubilee Centre Director Prof. James Arthur, and Director of Education Dr. Tom Harrison joined Charlotte and University of Birmingham Chancellor Lord Bilimoria as part of the celebrations. During her acceptance speech, Charlotte spoke to University of Birmingham graduands of the importance of service, character virtues and undertaking meaningful social action.

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Director of Education Gives Keynote at Teaching and Learning Conference

05/07/16

On Tuesday 28th June 2016, Director of Education Dr. Tom Harrison gave a keynote address at the University of Birmingham Teaching and Learning Conference: Developing the Birmingham Graduate. Tom's keynote lecture was titled 'An internal perspective - from thinking and doing to being and becoming' and communicated to delegates why character matters, revealing theoretical and practical insights on how to build students’ character for individual and societal benefit.

The abstract for Tom's lecture is below:

Abstract - 'An internal perspective - from thinking and doing to being and becoming'

Teaching and learning at universities primarily focusses on enabling students to think and do. However, education, at all levels, should also help students be and become in order to flourish - an aspiration outlined in the Birmingham Graduate. To flourish, both as individuals and as a society, we need to develop key character virtues - such as compassion, courage, resilience, good citizenship and curiosity amongst many others.

This presentation will discuss the rising interest in character education in the UK as well as globally. It will demonstrate how university education should be about learning knowledge as well as building good character in students. Good character that will be necessary for students to successfully perform the many roles they will undertake when the leave the University of Birmingham. 

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Dr. Tom Harrison Publishes on Cultivating Cyber-Phronesis

04/07/16

Dr. Tom Harrison has published a paper titled ‘Cultivating cyber-phronesis: a new educational approach to tackle cyberbullying’ in Pastoral Care in Education: An International Journal of Personal, Social and Emotional Development. With cyberbullying increasingly presenting a concern for parents, schools, teachers and pupils, this paper explores if there is a need to rethink traditional educational approaches to dealing with the issue.  The abstract can be found below and the paper can be accessed here.

Abstract: 
Cyberbullying is a pervasive and troubling moral concern for teachers, schools, parents and pupils. As children and young people in England are now more likely to be bullied online than face-to-face, this article explores if there is a need to rethink traditional educational approaches to dealing with the issue. The article starts with a critique of the current dominant approaches to tackling cyberbullying in schools, which draw predominantly on deontological and utilitarian moral philosophies. It then details what an Aristotelian character education approach to cyberbullying would consist of. At its heart is a requirement to enable children and young people to become digitally virtuous citizens, through the development of cyber-phronesis. The article concludes with a description of moral educational interventions that would increase the likelihood of children and young people making both ‘good’ and ‘wise’ choices when online.

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Prof. Arthur Presents Character Awards With Edward Timpson MP

04/07/16

On Thursday 30th June 2016, Prof. James Arthur, Director of the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues, presented the Department for Education Character Awards with Edward Timpson MP, Minister for Children and Families. The Character Awards celebrated nine outstanding practitioners in character education from across regions in England, including the National Award winner, Thoresby Primary School in Hull. Details of all of the Character Awards winners can be found below, including the announcement by the Minister available here. During his speech, Minister Timpson thanked the Jubilee Centre for leading the way on research in character education in the UK.

The Character Awards were made as part of the Association for Character Education (ACE) inaugural conference, at the University of Birmingham School. The conference also marked the launch of the ACE e-journal Character Matters. ACE, supported by the Jubilee Centre, is a 'bottom-up', grassroots organisation, created to respond to the growing interest in character education in Britain.

The conference, chaired by ACE Chairman Gary Lewis (Head of Kings Langley Secondary School), featured key note addresses from Prof. James Arthur (Director of the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues) and Michael Roden (Principal of the University of Birmingham School), Charlotte Hill (CEO of Step up to Serve) with Nicky Broomhall (Head of Star Academy, Sandyford) and Thomas Munnelly (#iwill Ambassador), and Lord James O'Shaughnessy and Jo Glen (Floreat Education). There were also workshops by leading practitioners and organisation in the field of character education.

Association for Character Education Executive.

L-R: Jo Glen, Linda Sanders, Prof. James Arthur, Edward Timpson MP, Gary Lewis, Michael Roden, Dr. Tom Harrison, Geoff Smith

Image used courtesy of the Department for Education

 

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Unicef Montenegro and Partners Visit Jubilee Centre

30/06/16

On 19th – 22nd June 2016 the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues was delighted to welcome guests from the My Character and Values project team, supported by Unicef in Montenegro, the Ministry for Education, and Principals from top schools across Montenegro. Also visiting were colleagues from the Innovation Lab, a UNICEF initiative, who work on youth social action.  The visit formed part of the Jubilee Centre’s ongoing partnership with Unicef Montenegro and provided an opportunity for those working to implement character education across the country, to discuss the progress of their work and next steps. During their time in Birmingham, the group gave presentations on their work and were able to visit a range of different schools, including the new University of Birmingham School, dedicated to character education, and two local primary schools – Brownmead Primary Academy and Topcliffe Primary School. The group also heard more about the Jubilee Centre’s current research, and in particular, its work on youth social action and the Habits of Service project.

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Deputy Director and Research Fellow Publish on South Korean Education

21/06/16

Deputy Director, Professor Kristján Kristjánsson, and Research Fellow, Dr. David Walker, have published a paper titled 'Misery in dark shadows behind the high achievement scores in South Korean schooling: an ethnographic study' in Educational Review. The paper's lead author, Soonjung Kwon is a former School of Education PhD student. The abstract for the paper can be found below and the full paper can be accessed here.

 

Abstract

This article explores some of the hidden background behind the highly praised school results in South Korea. An ethnographic case study is used to cast light on how schooling is actually experienced by South Korean students. Two main results are reported from these data. First, evidence is presented of damaging cultural elements such as internalised norms of resistance and conformity, symbolised helplessness, studying without any interest in controversial issues, an internalised culture of “dealing” and widespread playing with mobile phones, sleeping and applying make-up in class. Second, evidence is presented of an institutionalised school violence involving mechanisms of control, abusive and violent everyday language, explicit school violence and delinquent/deviant behaviour. The article concludes that there is something unique and deeply disturbing about institutionalised violence in South Korean schools and that the abysmally low subjective wellbeing levels of pupils are no coincidence.

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Centre Staff Visit Netherlands Defense Academy

21/06/16

Prof. James Arthur (Director) and Dr. David Walker (Research Fellow) visited the Netherlands Defense Academy, Breda on Thursday 16th June to discuss the Soldiers of Character project with sociologist Prof. Rene Moelker.  The aim of the visit was to gather information about the ethical development of Dutch military officers.  Prof Arthur and Dr Walker will also visit US Military cadets at the United States Military Academy at West Point next year, in order to contextualise the Soldiers of Character research study. 

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Prof. David Carr Presents at University of Chicago

15/06/16

On Thursday 9th June 2016, Prof. David Carr presented at a seminar as part of the ‘Virtue, Happiness and the Meaning of Life’ project. The seminar was hosted by Professor Candace Vogler, the project lead, in the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society of the University of Chicago and funded by the John Templeton Foundation. Over a period of five days, the seminar featured twenty presentations from an internationally distinguished group of philosophers, social scientists and theologians.  Professor Carr’s presentation explored the possibility of developing a secular sense of spirituality for wider public usage and education.

Professor Carr's paper is available to read here.

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Centre Holds Character and Virtue in the Professions Conference

09/06/16

On 2nd-4th June 2016, the Jubilee Centre held the Character and Virtue in the Professions Conference on campus at the University of Birmingham. The three-day event brought together scholars and practitioners from across the professions to speak about the role of character and virtue in both training and practice of professions such as nursing, medicine, teaching, business and the military.

The international conference was attended by delegates from around the world, and included key note speeches from Prof. Sarah Banks (Durham), Prof. Geoff Moore (Durham), Prof. Justin Oakley (Monash), Prof. Ann Gallagher (Surrey) and Prof. Nancy Sherman (Georgetown). 

Journalist Richard McComb attended the conference and wrote a blog about ethical insights from an outside. It can be read here.

 

The abstracts from all of the papers given at the conference can be accessed below, as well as the full programme.

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Jubilee Centre #iwill Pledge

08/06/16

Update on our #iwill pledge

Since 2013, the Jubilee Centre has supported the #iwill campaign, which aims to make involvement in social action part of life for 10-20 year-olds across the UK. The Centre is proud of its partnership with the campaign and delighted to celebrate this year’s Share Your Pledge Day.

The Centre has pledged to:

  • Research the development of character virtues in young people who take part in youth social action programmes. The research will enable a greater understanding of the impact of youth social action on character and its potential double benefit;
  • Provide a researcher to lead the research;
  • Develop appropriate tools and methodology for measuring character in youth social action settings;
  • Work with the Step Up To Serve partners to carry out the research;
  • Gather data and analyse findings;
  • Report on research and publish findings.

Since pledging to the #iwill campaign, the Centre has carried out a study with over 20 youth social action providers in the UK, exploring character and youth social action, with findings published in a report available here. These organisations collectively work with over a million young people. The Centre is working on a new project to discover ‘What is a habit of service for young people in the UK?’. The research will involve surveying over 2,000 young people in summer 2016, followed by more in-depth qualitative research in early 2017. Research Associate Emma Taylor is undertaking the research, and is based in Step Up To Serve’s offices in London.

The Centre has also supported the #iwill campaign by recognising youth social action through the Jubilee Youth Awards and publishing the Statement on Youth Social Action and Character Development. The Centre also sponsors the #iwill Ambassadors, contributing to the selection process, publishing the stories of the ambassadors, and hosting events at the #iwill campaign anniversaries.

Centre Director Professor James Arthur says “The Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues is proud of its close association and the joint work it has undertaken with Step Up To Serve and the #iwill campaign. Together we have been able to bring researchers and practitioners together to explore big questions such as ‘how does social action transform the character of young people as well as the communities they live in?'”

The #iwill campaign was launched in November 2013 by HRH The Prince of Wales and the leaders of the three main political parties in Westminster at the time. HRH is Patron of Step Up To Serve and the #iwill campaign, with organisations across UK society represented on an Advisory Board, including Professor James Arthur. 

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Professor David Carr Delivers Keynote at University of Lodz, Poland

08/06/16

On Saturday 28th May 2016, Professor David Carr presented a keynote paper at a conference on Ethical Education to an audience of ethics teachers and moral educationalists from various European countries including Poland, Germany, Spain, the Netherlands and Belgium. The conference took place at the Institute of Philosophy of the University of Lodz in Poland and was organised as part of a project entitled ‘Ethics in the System of Education in Poland and Selected Western Countries (Germany, United Kingdom, Spain, Portugal, France, USA, Norway, Finland). The project is being run by the Head of the Department of Ethics at the University of Lodz and is funded by Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education. David’s paper, entitled ‘Towards the Education of Moral Character and Virtue’, defended an Aristotelian approach to moral education and the ethics of teaching, and drew on recent work in the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues. The paper is available to view here

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Schools Celebrate Schools Gratitude Day

02/06/16

The Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues celebrated Schools Gratitude Day on 20th May 2016, with almost 80 schools across the UK and internationally taking part in a range of activities. The purpose of the Day was to further emphasise the concept of gratitude through activities run and inspired by the Teacher’s Pack produced by the Centre, containing activities and ideas for exploring gratitude in schools.

Gratitude stories were read in school assemblies, people watched Thank You Films created by young people and listened to the benefits of gratitude. ‘Gratitude Visits’ were arranged, giving pupils the chance to thank a special someone for contributing to their communities. One popular choice of activity was building a Gratitude Tree. Young people were asked to think about what they enjoy doing in their lives and to think about who they rely on to enjoy that activity. Below is a photo of pupils from St. Luke’s C of E Primary School and their gratitude tree - thank you for sharing!

Schools Gratitude Day provided schools who had taken part in the 2016 Thank You Letter Awards with an opportunity to award all shortlisted finalists with their certificates and book vouchers, and for everyone else that took part to celebrate gratitude and hold their own Thank You Letter Awards ceremonies.

Schools Gratitude Day offers people a chance to collaborate with one another and the community by sharing who one another are grateful to and recognising why gratitude is such an important virtue. The Schools Gratitude Day Teaching Pack is still available to download and use at: www.jubileecentre.ac.uk/schoolsgratitudeday

Thank You to everyone who took part.

 

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Taking 'Thanks' for Granted: New Report Published

01/06/16

Taking 'Thanks' for Granted: Unravelling the Concept of Gratitude in a Developmental, Cross-Cultural Analysis.

Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues Research Fellows Dr. Liz Gulliford and Dr. Blaire Morgan secured small grant funding from the Society for Educational Studies (SES) to replicate three key studies from the Attitude for Gratitude project with an Australian sample. The study compared how Australians and Britons understand gratitude and the factors which influence the way in which gratitude is conceived and experienced in Australia.

Key findings from the study show that Australians associated gratitude with fewer negative features than were found in the UK study. ‘Indebtedness/obligation’ was named as a feature of gratitude by 29% of UK participants and by only 6.5% of Australian respondents. Likewise ‘guilt’ was named by 17% of the UK participants but by only 2.6% of the Australian sample. Australians, therefore, seem less likely to reference negative associations of gratitude than UK respondents.

Relatedly, findings from this preliminary study suggest that negative aspects of gratitude (ulterior and malicious motives, mixed emotions and indebtedness) impacted less on reported gratitude for Australian children in comparison with UK children. Similar results are found for adult and adolescent Australians whose gratitude seemed to be less impacted by a benefactor’s ulterior motives than in the UK.

The final report is available to view here

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Dr. David Walker Publishes Chapter on Military Research Methods

30/05/16

Dr. David Walker has published a chapter titled 'Putting ‘Insider-ness’ to Work: Researching Identity Narratives of Career Soldiers about to Leave the Army' in The Routledge Companion to Military Research Methods.  This edited volume brings together an extensive group of authors from a range of disciplinary perspectives whose chapters engage with the conceptual, practical and political questions raised when doing military research. Find out more at the publisher's page here.

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Lord Rabbi Sacks Receives Templeton Prize 2016

27/05/16

Yesterday, on Thursday 26th May 2016, Lord Rabbi Jonathan Sacks was presented with the Templeton Prize at a ceremony at Central Hall Westminster, London. 

In his acceptance speech, Lord Sacks said that being awarded the Prize had 'left me moved, humbled, thankful, and deeply motivated'. Focussing on the importance of memory and what he referred to as 'outsourcing', Lord Sacks spoke of the importance of morality in the free world. 'A free society is a moral achievement. Without self-restraint, without the capacity to defer the gratification of instinct, and without the habits of heart and deed that we call virtues, we will eventually lose our freedom.'

The full speech is available to read here

 

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Floreat Education Launches Character Programme Website

26/05/16

Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues partner Floreat Education has launched its Floreat Character Programme. The site, funded by the Department for Education, supports both the 'taught' and 'caught' approaches to developing pupils' character in school and is separated into three key areas:

  • Culture and training materials, aimed at breaking down how we habituate and model virtuous behaviour;
  • The Virtue Literacy Programme, which guides teachers in the use of children's stories to explore character;
  • Service Learning, which provide opportunities to practise the application of virtue both inside and outside the classroom.

Floreat Education was established in 2013 in order to create a family of world-class schools where every child can flourish. The Floreat Education Academies Trust is comprised of five primary schools, three of which will open in September 2016. The Jubilee Centre has acted as a strategic adviser to Floreat Education, and Floreat has used the Centre's resources, including the Framework for Character Education in Schools to inform its own work.

Access the Floreat Character Programme here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Deputy Director Publishes on Flourishing in Education

24/05/16

Deputy Director of the Jubilee Centre, Professor Kristján Kristjánsson, has published a paper titled 'Recent Work on Flourishing as the Aim of Education: A Critical Review' in the British Journal of Educational Studies.  The abstract is below and the paper is available to view online here.

Flourishing, understood along semi-Aristotelian lines, has re-emerged recently as an account of the ideal aim of education, for instance, in works by educational philosophers Brighouse, White and de Ruyter. This article aims at critically reviewing this new paradigm by subjecting it to philosophical and educational scrutiny. Throughout I compare and contrast this paradigm with Aristotelian flourishing and explore the specific role of teachers as facilitators of students’ flourishing and sense of meaning.

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Research Fellow Writes for The Conversation

21/07/16

Dr. Blaire Morgan, Research Fellow, has written a piece for The Conversation titled 'Is social media messing with children’s morals?' Blaire's research is on the Influence of Parents and Social Media on Children's Moral Functioning, and the article discusses findings from a recent parents poll for the project, which found that  more than half of UK parents think popular social media sites hamper their children’s moral development.

The article is available to read below.

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Deputy Director Chairs Keynote Panel at IPEN Festival in Dallas

20/07/16

Professor Kristján Kristjánsson chaired a keynote panel at the first International Festival on Positive Education in Dallas on 19th July. The panel explored the philosophical and conceptual underpinnings of positive education and included presentations by Professors Nancy Snow, Randall Curren and Blaine Fowers. Find out more about the Festival here.

 

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The Jubilee Youth Awards 2016

15/07/16

On Thursday 14th July 2016, the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues held the 2016 Jubilee Youth Awards at the House of Lords. Hosted by Lord James O’Shaughnessy, 14 young people from across the UK were honoured with Jubilee Youth Awards, across three of the Jubilee Centre's awards and contests programmes. 

The Centre celebrated the winners of the Jubilee Youth Awards for Service, the Thank You Letter Awards and Why Virtue Matters: Essay Contest, for 2016. Over 40,000 young people have taken part in the 2016 Thank You Letter Awards, across 200 schools. 600 essays were submitted into the Why Virtues Matters Essay Contest and 100 nominations were received and considered for a Jubilee Youth Award for Service.

The ceremony was introduced by Prof. James Arthur, Director of the Jubilee Centre, and awards were presented by Sir Nick Parker, Chair of Trustees of Step up to Serve, and Lord O'Shaughnessy. Dr. Rania Marandos, Deputy Chief Executive of Step Up To Serve, Dr. Tom Harrison, Director of Education for the Jubilee Centre and Prof. Kristján Kristjánsson, Deputy Director for the Jubilee Centre announced the winners across each of the three categories.

The Jubilee Youth Award Winners are listed below:

Jubilee Youth Award for Service Winners, 2016

Andrew Lees                                     Lanarkshire

Charlotte King                                   West Sussex

Jordan Dixon                                     Central London

Kimarla Johnson                               Greater London

Mary-Beth McFern                           East Lothian

Patrick Cantellow                              Kent

Reece Lunt                                        Tyne and Wear

Yasmin Tyrrell                                   Belfast

 

Thank You Letter Award Winners, 2016

Primary Winner:

Adaeze Ordu                                     St Teresa Catholic Primary School, Greater London

Secondary Winner:

Peace Buraimo                                  King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Girls, West Midlands

 

Essay Contest: Why Virtue Matters Winners, 2016

Primary Winners:

Lucy Snowdon                                   Dame Allan’s Schools, Northumberland              

Mollie McHardy,                               Heversham St Peter’s CE Primary School, Cumbria

Secondary Winners:

Jessica Bonner                                  Highclare School, West Midlands  

Awais Hussain                                  Dixons Kings Academy, West Yorkshire

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Jubilee Centre Poll: Social Media Sites Obstruct Children’s Moral Development, Say Parents

14/07/16

More than half of UK parents think popular social media sites hamper their children’s moral development, according to a poll commissioned by the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues. The 'parent poll' also reveals only 15% of parents think the popular sites provide a positive influence on young people’s character. A significant number of parents (40%) are “concerned” or “extremely concerned” about the negative and potentially harmful impact of social media. The poll, the first of its type conducted in the UK, provides a unique insight into the way moral values are portrayed on social media. It points to widespread parental anxieties about the influence of online networks on children as young as 11, who are often using the sites despite age limits. Other key findings include:

  • Anger, arrogance and hatred are among the top negative character traits, or vices, reported by parents on social media;
  • A quarter of parents highlight a lack of forgiveness and self-control among users;
  • As an antidote to the negative findings, almost three-quarters (72%) of parents who use social media see content containing a positive moral message at least once a day;
  • The “character strengths” promoted most regularly are humour, appreciation of beauty, creativity, love, courage and kindness.

The full press release is available here. The story became the lead article on the BBC Education pages on 18th July 2016.

You can read more about the virtues and vices of social media in this latest Jubilee Centre blog post.

The project page is available here.

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Research Fellows Present at Eighth European Positive Psychology Conference (ECPP)

11/07/16

The Eighth European Positive Psychology Conference (ECPP) took place in Angers, France, between June 28th and July 1st 2016.  Research Fellows Drs. Blaire Morgan and Liz Gulliford spoke at one of the 24 thematic paper sessions, presenting the findings from their cross-cultural replication of three empirical strands of the An Attitude for Gratitude research project. Liz and Blaire gave a paper based on the Taking 'Thanks' for Granted: Unravelling the Concept of Gratitude in a Developmental, Cross-Cultural Analysis report, which was funded by a Society for Educational Studies (SES) small grant, and presented findings of a cross-cultural study of the understanding of gratitude to an international audience.

An abstract for Liz and Blaire's presentation is given below and the PowerPoint presentation is available here.

Paper Session: Cross-Cultural Differences in Gratitude Experience
Theme: Cross-Cultural Approach
Authors:  B. Morgan (1) L. Gulliford (1) L. Waters (2)
Authors' Address: (1) Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues, University of Birmingham, UK (2) Centre for Positive Psychology, Melbourne Graduate School of Education, University of Melbourne, Australia
Abstract: As is well known, gratitude has been related to a host of intrapersonal, interpersonal and health benefits. However, gratitude research tends to have had the narrow aim of increasing gratitude experience without much opportunity for probing the meaning of the concept itself. We believe a more effective method of fostering moral values, such as gratitude, would be to encourage reflection on what gratitude is, and when and why it is experienced (Morgan, Gulliford & Carr, 2015; Carr, Morgan & Gulliford, 2015). We have developed instruments to shed light on both children’s and adults’ understanding of the concept. We have used these instruments to examine developmental differences in the understanding of gratitude in both the UK and Australia and report the extent to which understandings of gratitude differ cross-culturally. Findings from a prototype analysis of gratitude conducted in Australia will be compared with our UK study (Morgan, Gulliford & Kristjansson, 2014), and the earlier findings of Lambert, Graham and Fincham’s (2009) US study. This cross-cultural comparison of ‘gratitude features’ reveals that, relative to Australia and US, our UK sample demonstrates more negative associations with the construct. We also present findings from a vignette questionnaire probing intuitions about gratitude. The questionnaire was compiled following an extensive literature review on how gratitude is conceptualised (Gulliford, Morgan, & Kristjánsson, 2013). It presents various scenarios to which respondents decide whether (and to what degree) gratitude is appropriate. For instance, if a benefactor has ulterior motives, are you still grateful for the benefit they bestow? Should you be grateful to someone who is doing their job? We compare UK responses to this questionnaire with our Australian sample of young people and adults. Australian adults, for example, deem benefits that do not materialise as more worthy of gratitude than do UK adults, and UK adults report less gratitude in response to non-valuable benefits. Finally we report on the findings from our gratitude stories for children. The stories incorporate themes elaborated in the vignettes, enabling us to examine the way in which different factors that may impact on gratitude differ across the lifespan and between different cultures. Whilst in need of further replication, these results seem to suggest that Australian children may place fewer conditions on when gratitude is due. This research provides important insights into the conception of gratitude, how this might change and develop across the life-span, and the degree to which it differs cross-culturally. Such differences will inevitably impact upon gratitude interventions and gratitude measurement. Furthermore, educational interventions are currently adopted from different countries (primarily from the USA) without appropriate sensitivity to cultural differences. We believe these cross-cultural differences deserve further scrutiny.

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Can You Teach Character? Centre Produce Short Film

11/07/16

As part of the content for the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues and University of Birmingham MA in Character Education, the Jubilee Centre has produced a short film titled Can You Teach Character? The film, made by award-winning producers The Moment, includes the voices of staff and pupils from the University of Birmingham School, a school dedicated to the development of character of its pupils. The short film demonstrates the character-led approach that the University of Birmingham School has taken, and the response from pupils on the development of their character. The film is available to view here

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Jubilee Centre Partner Awarded UoB Alumna of the Year

08/07/16

On Thursday 7th July, Charlotte Hill, CEO of Step Up to Serve, was awarded an honorary degree at the University of Birmingham degree congregations, and awarded the title of Alumna of the Year. Charlotte studied Political Science and Philosophy at the University of Birmingham. Following the 2012 review into youth social action, Step Up To Serve was established in 2013 to coordinate the #iwill campaign. It is run by a small dynamic team of dedicated and experienced staff, supported by secondees from partner organisations. The Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues has partnered with Step Up to Serve since its launch, and continues to collaborate on multiple projects, and provide a dedicated academic researcher to work as part of the Step Up to Serve team.

Jubilee Centre Director Prof. James Arthur, and Director of Education Dr. Tom Harrison joined Charlotte and University of Birmingham Chancellor Lord Bilimoria as part of the celebrations. During her acceptance speech, Charlotte spoke to University of Birmingham graduands of the importance of service, character virtues and undertaking meaningful social action.

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Director of Education Gives Keynote at Teaching and Learning Conference

05/07/16

On Tuesday 28th June 2016, Director of Education Dr. Tom Harrison gave a keynote address at the University of Birmingham Teaching and Learning Conference: Developing the Birmingham Graduate. Tom's keynote lecture was titled 'An internal perspective - from thinking and doing to being and becoming' and communicated to delegates why character matters, revealing theoretical and practical insights on how to build students’ character for individual and societal benefit.

The abstract for Tom's lecture is below:

Abstract - 'An internal perspective - from thinking and doing to being and becoming'

Teaching and learning at universities primarily focusses on enabling students to think and do. However, education, at all levels, should also help students be and become in order to flourish - an aspiration outlined in the Birmingham Graduate. To flourish, both as individuals and as a society, we need to develop key character virtues - such as compassion, courage, resilience, good citizenship and curiosity amongst many others.

This presentation will discuss the rising interest in character education in the UK as well as globally. It will demonstrate how university education should be about learning knowledge as well as building good character in students. Good character that will be necessary for students to successfully perform the many roles they will undertake when the leave the University of Birmingham. 

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Dr. Tom Harrison Publishes on Cultivating Cyber-Phronesis

04/07/16

Dr. Tom Harrison has published a paper titled ‘Cultivating cyber-phronesis: a new educational approach to tackle cyberbullying’ in Pastoral Care in Education: An International Journal of Personal, Social and Emotional Development. With cyberbullying increasingly presenting a concern for parents, schools, teachers and pupils, this paper explores if there is a need to rethink traditional educational approaches to dealing with the issue.  The abstract can be found below and the paper can be accessed here.

Abstract: 
Cyberbullying is a pervasive and troubling moral concern for teachers, schools, parents and pupils. As children and young people in England are now more likely to be bullied online than face-to-face, this article explores if there is a need to rethink traditional educational approaches to dealing with the issue. The article starts with a critique of the current dominant approaches to tackling cyberbullying in schools, which draw predominantly on deontological and utilitarian moral philosophies. It then details what an Aristotelian character education approach to cyberbullying would consist of. At its heart is a requirement to enable children and young people to become digitally virtuous citizens, through the development of cyber-phronesis. The article concludes with a description of moral educational interventions that would increase the likelihood of children and young people making both ‘good’ and ‘wise’ choices when online.

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Prof. Arthur Presents Character Awards With Edward Timpson MP

04/07/16

On Thursday 30th June 2016, Prof. James Arthur, Director of the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues, presented the Department for Education Character Awards with Edward Timpson MP, Minister for Children and Families. The Character Awards celebrated nine outstanding practitioners in character education from across regions in England, including the National Award winner, Thoresby Primary School in Hull. Details of all of the Character Awards winners can be found below, including the announcement by the Minister available here. During his speech, Minister Timpson thanked the Jubilee Centre for leading the way on research in character education in the UK.

The Character Awards were made as part of the Association for Character Education (ACE) inaugural conference, at the University of Birmingham School. The conference also marked the launch of the ACE e-journal Character Matters. ACE, supported by the Jubilee Centre, is a 'bottom-up', grassroots organisation, created to respond to the growing interest in character education in Britain.

The conference, chaired by ACE Chairman Gary Lewis (Head of Kings Langley Secondary School), featured key note addresses from Prof. James Arthur (Director of the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues) and Michael Roden (Principal of the University of Birmingham School), Charlotte Hill (CEO of Step up to Serve) with Nicky Broomhall (Head of Star Academy, Sandyford) and Thomas Munnelly (#iwill Ambassador), and Lord James O'Shaughnessy and Jo Glen (Floreat Education). There were also workshops by leading practitioners and organisation in the field of character education.

Association for Character Education Executive.

L-R: Jo Glen, Linda Sanders, Prof. James Arthur, Edward Timpson MP, Gary Lewis, Michael Roden, Dr. Tom Harrison, Geoff Smith

Image used courtesy of the Department for Education

 

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Unicef Montenegro and Partners Visit Jubilee Centre

30/06/16

On 19th – 22nd June 2016 the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues was delighted to welcome guests from the My Character and Values project team, supported by Unicef in Montenegro, the Ministry for Education, and Principals from top schools across Montenegro. Also visiting were colleagues from the Innovation Lab, a UNICEF initiative, who work on youth social action.  The visit formed part of the Jubilee Centre’s ongoing partnership with Unicef Montenegro and provided an opportunity for those working to implement character education across the country, to discuss the progress of their work and next steps. During their time in Birmingham, the group gave presentations on their work and were able to visit a range of different schools, including the new University of Birmingham School, dedicated to character education, and two local primary schools – Brownmead Primary Academy and Topcliffe Primary School. The group also heard more about the Jubilee Centre’s current research, and in particular, its work on youth social action and the Habits of Service project.

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Deputy Director and Research Fellow Publish on South Korean Education

21/06/16

Deputy Director, Professor Kristján Kristjánsson, and Research Fellow, Dr. David Walker, have published a paper titled 'Misery in dark shadows behind the high achievement scores in South Korean schooling: an ethnographic study' in Educational Review. The paper's lead author, Soonjung Kwon is a former School of Education PhD student. The abstract for the paper can be found below and the full paper can be accessed here.

 

Abstract

This article explores some of the hidden background behind the highly praised school results in South Korea. An ethnographic case study is used to cast light on how schooling is actually experienced by South Korean students. Two main results are reported from these data. First, evidence is presented of damaging cultural elements such as internalised norms of resistance and conformity, symbolised helplessness, studying without any interest in controversial issues, an internalised culture of “dealing” and widespread playing with mobile phones, sleeping and applying make-up in class. Second, evidence is presented of an institutionalised school violence involving mechanisms of control, abusive and violent everyday language, explicit school violence and delinquent/deviant behaviour. The article concludes that there is something unique and deeply disturbing about institutionalised violence in South Korean schools and that the abysmally low subjective wellbeing levels of pupils are no coincidence.

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Centre Staff Visit Netherlands Defense Academy

21/06/16

Prof. James Arthur (Director) and Dr. David Walker (Research Fellow) visited the Netherlands Defense Academy, Breda on Thursday 16th June to discuss the Soldiers of Character project with sociologist Prof. Rene Moelker.  The aim of the visit was to gather information about the ethical development of Dutch military officers.  Prof Arthur and Dr Walker will also visit US Military cadets at the United States Military Academy at West Point next year, in order to contextualise the Soldiers of Character research study. 

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Prof. David Carr Presents at University of Chicago

15/06/16

On Thursday 9th June 2016, Prof. David Carr presented at a seminar as part of the ‘Virtue, Happiness and the Meaning of Life’ project. The seminar was hosted by Professor Candace Vogler, the project lead, in the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society of the University of Chicago and funded by the John Templeton Foundation. Over a period of five days, the seminar featured twenty presentations from an internationally distinguished group of philosophers, social scientists and theologians.  Professor Carr’s presentation explored the possibility of developing a secular sense of spirituality for wider public usage and education.

Professor Carr's paper is available to read here.

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Centre Holds Character and Virtue in the Professions Conference

09/06/16

On 2nd-4th June 2016, the Jubilee Centre held the Character and Virtue in the Professions Conference on campus at the University of Birmingham. The three-day event brought together scholars and practitioners from across the professions to speak about the role of character and virtue in both training and practice of professions such as nursing, medicine, teaching, business and the military.

The international conference was attended by delegates from around the world, and included key note speeches from Prof. Sarah Banks (Durham), Prof. Geoff Moore (Durham), Prof. Justin Oakley (Monash), Prof. Ann Gallagher (Surrey) and Prof. Nancy Sherman (Georgetown). 

Journalist Richard McComb attended the conference and wrote a blog about ethical insights from an outside. It can be read here.

 

The abstracts from all of the papers given at the conference can be accessed below, as well as the full programme.

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Jubilee Centre #iwill Pledge

08/06/16

Update on our #iwill pledge

Since 2013, the Jubilee Centre has supported the #iwill campaign, which aims to make involvement in social action part of life for 10-20 year-olds across the UK. The Centre is proud of its partnership with the campaign and delighted to celebrate this year’s Share Your Pledge Day.

The Centre has pledged to:

  • Research the development of character virtues in young people who take part in youth social action programmes. The research will enable a greater understanding of the impact of youth social action on character and its potential double benefit;
  • Provide a researcher to lead the research;
  • Develop appropriate tools and methodology for measuring character in youth social action settings;
  • Work with the Step Up To Serve partners to carry out the research;
  • Gather data and analyse findings;
  • Report on research and publish findings.

Since pledging to the #iwill campaign, the Centre has carried out a study with over 20 youth social action providers in the UK, exploring character and youth social action, with findings published in a report available here. These organisations collectively work with over a million young people. The Centre is working on a new project to discover ‘What is a habit of service for young people in the UK?’. The research will involve surveying over 2,000 young people in summer 2016, followed by more in-depth qualitative research in early 2017. Research Associate Emma Taylor is undertaking the research, and is based in Step Up To Serve’s offices in London.

The Centre has also supported the #iwill campaign by recognising youth social action through the Jubilee Youth Awards and publishing the Statement on Youth Social Action and Character Development. The Centre also sponsors the #iwill Ambassadors, contributing to the selection process, publishing the stories of the ambassadors, and hosting events at the #iwill campaign anniversaries.

Centre Director Professor James Arthur says “The Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues is proud of its close association and the joint work it has undertaken with Step Up To Serve and the #iwill campaign. Together we have been able to bring researchers and practitioners together to explore big questions such as ‘how does social action transform the character of young people as well as the communities they live in?'”

The #iwill campaign was launched in November 2013 by HRH The Prince of Wales and the leaders of the three main political parties in Westminster at the time. HRH is Patron of Step Up To Serve and the #iwill campaign, with organisations across UK society represented on an Advisory Board, including Professor James Arthur. 

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Professor David Carr Delivers Keynote at University of Lodz, Poland

08/06/16

On Saturday 28th May 2016, Professor David Carr presented a keynote paper at a conference on Ethical Education to an audience of ethics teachers and moral educationalists from various European countries including Poland, Germany, Spain, the Netherlands and Belgium. The conference took place at the Institute of Philosophy of the University of Lodz in Poland and was organised as part of a project entitled ‘Ethics in the System of Education in Poland and Selected Western Countries (Germany, United Kingdom, Spain, Portugal, France, USA, Norway, Finland). The project is being run by the Head of the Department of Ethics at the University of Lodz and is funded by Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education. David’s paper, entitled ‘Towards the Education of Moral Character and Virtue’, defended an Aristotelian approach to moral education and the ethics of teaching, and drew on recent work in the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues. The paper is available to view here

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Schools Celebrate Schools Gratitude Day

02/06/16

The Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues celebrated Schools Gratitude Day on 20th May 2016, with almost 80 schools across the UK and internationally taking part in a range of activities. The purpose of the Day was to further emphasise the concept of gratitude through activities run and inspired by the Teacher’s Pack produced by the Centre, containing activities and ideas for exploring gratitude in schools.

Gratitude stories were read in school assemblies, people watched Thank You Films created by young people and listened to the benefits of gratitude. ‘Gratitude Visits’ were arranged, giving pupils the chance to thank a special someone for contributing to their communities. One popular choice of activity was building a Gratitude Tree. Young people were asked to think about what they enjoy doing in their lives and to think about who they rely on to enjoy that activity. Below is a photo of pupils from St. Luke’s C of E Primary School and their gratitude tree - thank you for sharing!

Schools Gratitude Day provided schools who had taken part in the 2016 Thank You Letter Awards with an opportunity to award all shortlisted finalists with their certificates and book vouchers, and for everyone else that took part to celebrate gratitude and hold their own Thank You Letter Awards ceremonies.

Schools Gratitude Day offers people a chance to collaborate with one another and the community by sharing who one another are grateful to and recognising why gratitude is such an important virtue. The Schools Gratitude Day Teaching Pack is still available to download and use at: www.jubileecentre.ac.uk/schoolsgratitudeday

Thank You to everyone who took part.

 

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Taking 'Thanks' for Granted: New Report Published

01/06/16

Taking 'Thanks' for Granted: Unravelling the Concept of Gratitude in a Developmental, Cross-Cultural Analysis.

Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues Research Fellows Dr. Liz Gulliford and Dr. Blaire Morgan secured small grant funding from the Society for Educational Studies (SES) to replicate three key studies from the Attitude for Gratitude project with an Australian sample. The study compared how Australians and Britons understand gratitude and the factors which influence the way in which gratitude is conceived and experienced in Australia.

Key findings from the study show that Australians associated gratitude with fewer negative features than were found in the UK study. ‘Indebtedness/obligation’ was named as a feature of gratitude by 29% of UK participants and by only 6.5% of Australian respondents. Likewise ‘guilt’ was named by 17% of the UK participants but by only 2.6% of the Australian sample. Australians, therefore, seem less likely to reference negative associations of gratitude than UK respondents.

Relatedly, findings from this preliminary study suggest that negative aspects of gratitude (ulterior and malicious motives, mixed emotions and indebtedness) impacted less on reported gratitude for Australian children in comparison with UK children. Similar results are found for adult and adolescent Australians whose gratitude seemed to be less impacted by a benefactor’s ulterior motives than in the UK.

The final report is available to view here

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Dr. David Walker Publishes Chapter on Military Research Methods

30/05/16

Dr. David Walker has published a chapter titled 'Putting ‘Insider-ness’ to Work: Researching Identity Narratives of Career Soldiers about to Leave the Army' in The Routledge Companion to Military Research Methods.  This edited volume brings together an extensive group of authors from a range of disciplinary perspectives whose chapters engage with the conceptual, practical and political questions raised when doing military research. Find out more at the publisher's page here.

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Lord Rabbi Sacks Receives Templeton Prize 2016

27/05/16

Yesterday, on Thursday 26th May 2016, Lord Rabbi Jonathan Sacks was presented with the Templeton Prize at a ceremony at Central Hall Westminster, London. 

In his acceptance speech, Lord Sacks said that being awarded the Prize had 'left me moved, humbled, thankful, and deeply motivated'. Focussing on the importance of memory and what he referred to as 'outsourcing', Lord Sacks spoke of the importance of morality in the free world. 'A free society is a moral achievement. Without self-restraint, without the capacity to defer the gratification of instinct, and without the habits of heart and deed that we call virtues, we will eventually lose our freedom.'

The full speech is available to read here

 

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Floreat Education Launches Character Programme Website

26/05/16

Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues partner Floreat Education has launched its Floreat Character Programme. The site, funded by the Department for Education, supports both the 'taught' and 'caught' approaches to developing pupils' character in school and is separated into three key areas:

  • Culture and training materials, aimed at breaking down how we habituate and model virtuous behaviour;
  • The Virtue Literacy Programme, which guides teachers in the use of children's stories to explore character;
  • Service Learning, which provide opportunities to practise the application of virtue both inside and outside the classroom.

Floreat Education was established in 2013 in order to create a family of world-class schools where every child can flourish. The Floreat Education Academies Trust is comprised of five primary schools, three of which will open in September 2016. The Jubilee Centre has acted as a strategic adviser to Floreat Education, and Floreat has used the Centre's resources, including the Framework for Character Education in Schools to inform its own work.

Access the Floreat Character Programme here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Deputy Director Publishes on Flourishing in Education

24/05/16

Deputy Director of the Jubilee Centre, Professor Kristján Kristjánsson, has published a paper titled 'Recent Work on Flourishing as the Aim of Education: A Critical Review' in the British Journal of Educational Studies.  The abstract is below and the paper is available to view online here.

Flourishing, understood along semi-Aristotelian lines, has re-emerged recently as an account of the ideal aim of education, for instance, in works by educational philosophers Brighouse, White and de Ruyter. This article aims at critically reviewing this new paradigm by subjecting it to philosophical and educational scrutiny. Throughout I compare and contrast this paradigm with Aristotelian flourishing and explore the specific role of teachers as facilitators of students’ flourishing and sense of meaning.

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